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Dionne Warwick Anyone Who Had A Heart 1964 Original Top 10 Hit
 
03:10
Dionne Warwick's 1963 "Anyone Who Had A Heart" hit the Billboard Top Ten in January 1964 and peaked at #8 on the Billboard Hot 100. The tune was a crossover smash and hit #6 on the Billboard R&B Chart and #2 on the Billboard AC Chart. The tune was also a Top 10 hit in Australia, Belgium, Canada and South Africa. Written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David, the tune was presented to Dionne in unfinished form while she, Hal and Burt were rehearsing in Burt's Manhattan apartment for a recording session a few days hence at Bell Sound. Bacharach had finished the score but Hal had written only about a third of the lyric and was struggling with what Hal regarded a bad accent in the sixth line of the first stanza, which he could not resolve. Burt played a snippet of the tune for Dionne, and she fell in love with the tune and begged Hal to finish it. Hal, according to his wonderful 1968 book "What the World Needs Now and Other Love Lyrics", went to Burt's bedroom while Burt and Dionne rehearsed in the living room and finished the lyric. The tune was recorded at Bell Sound Studios in Manhattan in November 1963, days after the assassination of JFK, in the same session as Bacharach and David's "Walk On By" and "In the Land of Make Believe". Rumor has it Warwick nailed the tune in only one take. Cilla Black, a top female recording artist in the Uk but little known outside the UK recorded a cover version released in the UK in January 1964 before Scepter licensee Pye records could release Warwick's original and Black's cover became her first number one hit in the UK. Dionne's original version, released two weeks after Cilla's in the UK did make the UK charts at #43. However, in the USA, Black's cover died at Billboard #91. Black remained relatively unknown except to fans in the UK while Warwick went on to achieve worldwide stardom. Anyone Who Had A Heart was Dionne's first international million-seller. Linda Ronstadt covered the tune in 1994 as a tribute to Warwick for the album "Winter Light." Dusty Springfield cut a cover of the tune in 1964 and both Shelby Lynne and Atomic Kitten remakes were released in 2008. Writes Nick Tosches, the renowned writer, music journalist, novelist, biographer and poet in the January 7, 1972 issue of the rock magazine FUSION; ".getting into Dionne Warwick is like finding buried treasure. The Bacharach/David repertoire which milady chooses to sing is so fascinatingly cynical / fatalistic / stoical / emotional / happy, simultaneously! It's pure emotion. There is a whole lot more to emotion than some rock punk bursting his dexedrine-staved blood vessels by screaming "Baby I need you baby" into a microphone. Dionne Warwick is not a rock and roll singer. She's not a jazz singer either. Rhythm and blues? Nope. A pop singer? No way. Did you ever tongue-kiss with someone who barfed a Singapore Sling bolus into your mouth, and then four years later you're with someone else and you feel good and you realize how beautiful it all was and then it's all melancholy/happiness, sort of? That's the kind of singer Dionne Warwick is. She's beautiful. Dionne, paired with Bacharach's string/horn/reed arrangements, comes up as a lyric mezzo-sopranoid par-excellence, melodious/expressiveness-wise. If you've never gotten into her, you ought to. Get hep to Dionne Warwick. For your own sake."
Views: 3637671 dibotis
Dionne Warwick (Theme From) Valley of the Dolls 1968 Million Seller
 
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"Theme From 'Valley of the Dolls'" was recorded for the film of the same name. The song was written by Andre Previn and Dory Previn, and had initially been intended for Judy Garland before she was fired from the film. At the urging of Barbara Parkins, the song was given to Warwick. Dionne's John Williams' arranged original version is heard throughout the film. Due to contractual restrictions, Warwick's voice was substituted on the LP album recording of the soundtrack and Warwick was contractually permitted to appear only on the film's actual soundtrack and not the recording released on the 20th Century label. Record buyers of the 20th Century Soundtrack LP were sorely disappointed to find Warwick's voice absent from the LP, although no mention was made that the LP did not not contain the actual Warwick soundtrack. Warwick recut the tune for her home Scepter label with an arrangement by Pat Williams and conducted by Bacharach with Bacharach on piano, and this version hit #2 on the Billboard Hot 100 Singles Chart in February 1968, and #4 on the Canadian Chart, #28 in the UK, #2 on the Billboard AC Chart and #13 on the Billboard Rhythm and Blues Singles chart. The tune hit #1 on the Record World Chart in March 1968. "Theme From 'Valley of the Dolls', the "B" side of Dionne's million selling "I Say a Little Prayer", also became another million seller for Dionne. Dionne Warwick's twelfth album for the Scepter label "Dionne Warwick in Valley of the Dolls" featured the single along with another Top Ten hit "Do You Know the Way to San Jose". The album was smartly marketed as "The only album in which you will hear Dionne Warwick singing the "Theme From 'Valley of the Dolls'". The album hit #6 on the Billboard Album Chart and #2 on the Billboard Rhythm and Blues Album Chart and would remain on the Hot 100 Album Chart for over a year. It was recorded during the summer and fall of 1967 and was released early the next year. The album was awarded an RIAA gold award.
Views: 2326299 dibotis
Dionne Warwick Alfie 1967 Grammy Hall of Fame 2008
 
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Alfie, from the 1966 Michael Caine classic, was written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David, and was an Adacemy Award nominee for Best Song From A Motion Picture for 1966 (Born Free, the title track from the film of the same name, won). Bacharach wrote the tune with Warwick specifically in mind, but when the tune was pitched for the movie in London, Bacharach was overridden because the producers wanted a British singer to record the tune. Cilla Black recorded the tune and her version died at number 95 in the USA, although a hit in England. Ironically, Cilla's version was not used in the UK and European prints of the film; Sonny Rollins is heard in Australian prints of the film. When the film was released in the USA, United Artists felt a singer on their label should record the tune, so for the American prints of the film, Cher can be heard over the final credits, and her version peaked at 34 on the charts in 1966. Alfie was recorded by 42 other singers before Burt finally got his wish to record Alfie with Dionne and she took it all the way to # 5 on Billboard's Hot R&B Chart and #15 on Billboard's Hot 100. Dionne has stated Burt insisted that she record the tune since he had written it specifically for her to sing in the film, and she was reluctant after 42 other versions had been released and asked Burt, "How many more recordings of Alfie do you need?" Burt's reply? "Just one more, yours." She agreed to cut the tune because she needed one more track to complete the album according to Steve Tyrell. Originally released on the Here Where There Is Love LP in early 1967, the track was pulled from the album and played frequently by DJs all over the country. Dionne sang Alfie at the Academy Awards Ceremony in March to a world wide audience to much critical acclaim and the public began snap up her LP containing the tune. In March 1967 Scepter released the tune as the "B" side of The Beginning of Loneliness, a little known but beautiful Bacharach/David ballad. But, DJ's once again had the final word on the single and flipped it to make Alfie a huge hit, after Dionne's stunning performance of Alfie at the Academy Awards. The Here Where There Is Love LP hit the top twenty on the Billboard album chart and received an RIAA gold record award. In 2008, Dionne Warwick's recording of Alfie was chosen for the Grammy Hall of Fame. Previous Warwick recordings honored by the Hall of Fame: Walk on By-1998, and Don't Make Me Over-20.
Views: 814309 dibotis
Dionne Warwick I Say A Little Prayer 1967 Original Million Seller
 
03:20
Dionne Warwick's 1967 single I Say A Little Prayer was written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David and recorded at A&R Studios in Manhattan in June 1966. Engineering the recording was the legendary Phil Ramone who would later produce Billy Joel and many others. Bacharach arranged, conducts and is on piano. The tune was released as single in October 1967 after DJs all over the country started playing the album cut from the Windows of the World album. I Say A Little Prayer was certified RIAA Gold selling over 1 million copies and peaked at #4 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart in December 1967. The flip or B side (Theme from Valley of the Dolls), sung by Warwick in the motion picture, was also a million seller and rode the #2 position for 4 weeks on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart in February 1968 and hit # 1 on the Record World Chart the same month. I Say A Little Prayer/(Theme From) Valley of the Dolls is one of the most successful double sided hits of the Rock era. This is the rare unedited version in which Burt Bacharach can be heard on count off. I Say A Little Prayer was also the first RIAA certified million seller for Bacharach and David. Less than one year later, Aretha Franklin would take her cover of "I Say A Little Prayer" to the #10 spot on Billboard's Hot 100 singles chart. Writes Nick Tosches, the renowned writer, music journalist, novelist, biographer and poet in the January 7, 1972 issue of the rock magazine FUSION; "...getting into Dionne Warwick is like finding buried treasure. The Bacharach/David repertoire which milady chooses to sing is so fascinatingly cynical / fatalistic / stoical / emotional / happy, simultaneously! It's pure emotion. There is a whole lot more to emotion than some rock punk bursting his dexedrine-staved blood vessels by screaming "Baby I need you baby" into a microphone. Dionne Warwick is not a rock and roll singer. She's not a jazz singer either. Rhythm and blues? Nope. A pop singer? No way. Did you ever tongue-kiss with someone who barfed a Singapore Sling bolus into your mouth, and then four years later you're with someone else and you feel good and you realize how beautiful it all was and then it's all melancholy/happiness, sort of? That's the kind of singer Dionne Warwick is. She's beautiful. Dionne, paired with Bacharach's string/horn/reed arrangements, comes up as a lyric mezzo-sopranoid par-excellence, melodious/expressiveness-wise. If you've never gotten into her, you ought to. Get hep to Dionne Warwick. For your own sake."
Views: 9924442 dibotis
Dionne Warwick Message to Michael 1966 Top 10 Hit
 
03:09
Message to Michael" is a 1966 Top Ten hit by Dionne Warwick, written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David. The song was first recorded as "Message to Martha" by Jerry Butler in 1962 although his version was not released until December 1963 when it appeared on Butler's Need to Belong album. Marlene Dietrich recorded a German version of the song in 1964, singing to the instrumental track of the Butler original (with augmentations); Dietrich's version was entitled Kleine Treue Nachtigall ('faithful little nightingale'). In 1964 Bacharach had Lou Johnson record the song as "Kentucky Bluebird": this version reached Billboard's "Bubbling Under the Hot 100" chart at #104 that fall. Johnson's single was also released in the UK where it was swiftly covered by Adam Faith as "Message to Martha", which reached #12 UK in November 1964.[1] Warwick's association with the song began when she recommended it as a concert number to Sacha Distel, with whom she was headlining at the Paris Olympia Theatre in 1966. Jacques Denjean prepped a backing track to which Distel was to sing the song in concert; when Distel decided against performing the song, Warwick considered availing herself of the prepped instrumental track to record the song herself. Both Burt Bacharach and Hal David, when contacted by Warwick, were opposed to her singing what they maintained in its English version was a man's song. David also mentioned to Warwick that the only male name that could be subbed for "Martha" was "Michael", a name David disliked. Warwick took David's comment as a suggestion, recorded "Message to Michael" in a Paris recording studio, and added her vocals to the track prepped for Distel. Warwick would say that the most difficult part of the recording session was getting the French background vocalists to pronounce 'Michael' correctly. Although originally relegated to B-side status for Warwick's recording of a new Bacharach-David song "Here Where There is Love", "Message to Michael" was promoted to A-side status upon the single's March 1966 release, and Warwick introduced the single to American audiences on the 9 March 1966 broadcast of Hullabaloo. Burt Bacharach and Hal David received a rote credit as Warwick's producers on "Message to Michael" despite not being involved in the recording and in fact having been opposed to it. In his 1968 book: What the World Needs Now and Other Love Lyrics, Hal David emphatically admitted his misgivings over Warwick recording "Message to Michael" proved ill-founded, indeed stating "Dionne's vocal was so brilliant that it was obvious we had subconsciously written the song for her even while we thought we were writing it for a man".
Views: 364379 dibotis
Dionne Warwick Do You Know the Way to San Jose 1968 International Smash
 
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Dionne Warwick's 1968 million selling Grammy winning international smash hit the Billboard Top 10 in May 1968, Record World Top 40 at #8 and was also a UK smash at #8. The flip side "Let Me Be Lonely" also written by Bacharach and David also hit the Billboard Hot 100, one of many double sided hits Dionne recorded on Florence Greenberg's Scepter label. Dionne charted an astonishing eight Billboard Top Twenty hits in less than 30 months: Alfie-#15 July 67; I Say A Little Prayer-Nov 67-#4; Theme From Valley of the Dolls-Feb 68-#2 (4 weeks); Do You Know the Way to San Jose-May 68-#10; Promises, Promises-Oct 1968-#19; This Girl's In Love With You-March 1969-#7; You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling-#15-Sept 69; I'll Never Fall In Love Again-Jan 70-#6. In addition, Warwick hit the Top 40 in the same time period with Windows of the World-Sept 67, Who Is Gonna Love Me-July 68, and The April Fools-July 69. In 1969 Dionne was the first African-American Female Vocalist to win in the Grammy category Best Contemporary-Pop Vocal Performance, Female for Do You Know the Way to San Jose. "San Jose" was also used as the theme in Dodge automobile commercials in 1968 and 1969, for the Charger and the Challenger. "Do You Know the Way to San Jose" became "Dodge Is Turning Up the Fever Now"! Another note of trivia: the background vocalists for this session were Valerie Simpson (Ashford & Simpson), Cissy Houston and DeeDee Warwick. Writes Nick Tosches, the renowned writer, music journalist, novelist, biographer and poet in the January 7, 1972 issue of the rock magazine FUSION; ".getting into Dionne Warwick is like finding buried treasure. The Bacharach/David repertoire which milady chooses to sing is so fascinatingly cynical / fatalistic / stoical / emotional / happy, simultaneously! It's pure emotion. There is a whole lot more to emotion than some rock punk bursting his dexedrine-staved blood vessels by screaming "Baby I need you baby" into a microphone. Dionne Warwick is not a rock and roll singer. She's not a jazz singer either. Rhythm and blues? Nope. A pop singer? No way. Did you ever tongue-kiss with someone who barfed a Singapore Sling bolus into your mouth, and then four years later you're with someone else and you feel good and you realize how beautiful it all was and then it's all melancholy/happiness, sort of? That's the kind of singer Dionne Warwick is. She's beautiful. Dionne, paired with Bacharach's string/horn/reed arrangements, comes up as a lyric mezzo-sopranoid par-excellence, melodious/expressiveness-wise. If you've never gotten into her, you ought to. Get hep to Dionne Warwick. For your own sake."
Views: 561954 dibotis
Dionne Warwick Don't Make Me Over 1962 Pop & R & B Hit
 
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Don't Make Me Over was Dionne's Warwick's first collaborative effort with Burt Bacharach and Hal David. Warwick, whose real name is Marie Dionne Warrick, first met the team while singing background for The Drifters recording a Bacharach song entitled "Mexican Divorce". She then began demo recordings for the duo for songs like "Make It Easy On Yourself". As legend has it, Warwick originally thought "Make It Easy On Yourself" would be her debut as a solo artist and was angry when she learned Bacharach and David were giving the song to Jerry Butler. An upset Warwick balked, "don't make me over, man", which is street slang for "don't lie to me". The duo decided to make Warwick's epithet into a song for Warwick which she recorded at Bell Sound in Manhattan in August 1962. Released in November 1962, the recording of "Don't Make Me Over" was issued with a misspelling of the artist's name: Warwick, rather than Warrick. The singer decided to keep the misspelling and would be forever after known as Dionne Warwick. The song became Warwick's first hit single reaching #5 on Billboard's Hot R&B Singles Chart, #21 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart and #17 on the CashBox Top 100 in January 1963 becoming the first of over 56 hit singles Warwick charted between 1962 and 1998, making her second only to Aretha Franklin as the most successful female vocalist of the Rock era.
Views: 41116 dibotis
Dionne Warwick Walk On By 1964 International Million Seller-Unedited Version
 
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Dionne Warwick's huge worldwide hit Walk On By was rush released in May 1964 in both the USA and UK concurrently to prevent British artists from "stealing" Warwick's original version, as happened with "Anyone Who Had A Heart." "Walk On By" according to critics, is perhaps one of the best singles of the rock era and of the 20th century. On dual grand pianos in the studio were Artie Butler and the late great Paul Griffin. "Anyone Who Had A Heart" was released in December 1963 in the USA and became Warwick's first US top ten smash in January 1964. Dionne's single was not released in the UK until January 1964, and by that time, Sir George Martin took Cilla Black and Dionne's single into the studio and cut the tune with Cilla. Cilla's cover of "Anyone." beat Dionne's in release in the UK and became Cilla's first number one hit in the UK. Dionne's version stalled at UK 42. But, Scepter Records owner Florence Greenberg's strategy to release "Walk On By" concurrently paid off and became Warwick's first UK top ten smash and her second worldwide million seller. Dionne has joked that if she had coughed in the middle of "Anyone" Cilla would have followed suit. Walk On By hit #1 on the Billboard AC Chart and #6 on both the Top 100 and R&B charts in June 1964. A note of trivia: Walk On By was originally slated to be the "B" side of "Any Old Time of Day" but Murray the K, the famed New York DJ asked listeners of WINS-NYC to pick which side of the recording to promote and listeners chose "Walk On By" by a large margin and the tune was switched to the "A" side. Recorded in the same November 1963 session with Walk On By was Anyone Who Had A Heart. Walk On By has been hailed by music critics as one of the top 100 recordings of the twentieth century. Dionne Warwick's recording of Walk On By was inducted into the NARAS Grammy Hall of Fame in 1998 and was named one of the RIAA's 100 Songs of the Century. Writes Nick Tosches, the renowned writer, music journalist, novelist, biographer and poet in the January 7, 1972 issue of the rock magazine FUSION; ".getting into Dionne Warwick is like finding buried treasure. The Bacharach/David repertoire which milady chooses to sing is so fascinatingly cynical / fatalistic / stoical / emotional / happy, simultaneously! It's pure emotion. There is a whole lot more to emotion than some rock punk bursting his dexedrine-staved blood vessels by screaming "Baby I need you baby" into a microphone. Dionne Warwick is not a rock and roll singer. She's not a jazz singer either. Rhythm and blues? Nope. A pop singer? No way. Did you ever tongue-kiss with someone who barfed a Singapore Sling bolus into your mouth, and then four years later you're with someone else and you feel good and you realize how beautiful it all was and then it's all melancholy/happiness, sort of? That's the kind of singer Dionne Warwick is. She's beautiful. Dionne, paired with Bacharach's string/horn/reed arrangements, comes up as a lyric mezzo-sopranoid par-excellence, melodious/expressiveness-wise. If you've never gotten into her, you ought to. Get hep to Dionne Warwick. For your own sake."
Views: 46080 dibotis
Dionne Warwick I'll Never Fall In Love Again 1970 Smash Hit
 
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Dionne Warwick's hit single I'll Never Fall In Love Again, written and produced by Burt Bacharach and Hal David was released in December 1969 and raced into the Billboard and Cashbox Top 10 in January 1970 peaking at # 6 on the Hot 100 and at #1 on the Billboard AC chart. The tune was also featured in Dionne's album of the same name, which won the Grammy Award for 1970 for Best Contemporary Vocal Performance, Female at the Grammy Awards ceremony held in February 1971. The tune was written for the Bacharach/David Broadway Musical Promises, Promises and was one of five tunes from the show Bacharach arranged and produced for Warwick. Writes Nick Tosches, the renowned writer, music journalist, novelist, biographer and poet in the January 7, 1972 issue of the rock magazine FUSION; "The best Warwick album, the one that should be copped as an introductory taste of the artist in question is I'll Never Fall In Love Again (along with Golden Hits Part 1 and Part 2), which not only has the great title tune of the same name but also the great "The Wine Is Young," which trucks such mustard as The wine is young/our dreams are old/and it hurts me more than I can bear/to go on. This stuff is nifty; getting into Dionne Warwick is like finding buried treasure. The Bacharach/David repertoire which milady chooses to sing is so fascinatingly cynical / fatalistic / stoical / emotional / happy, simultaneously! It's pure emotion. There is a whole lot more to emotion than some rock punk bursting his dexedrine-staved blood vessels by screaming "Baby I need you baby" into a microphone. Dionne Warwick is not a rock and roll singer. She's not a jazz singer either. Rhythm and blues? Nope. A pop singer? No way. Did you ever tongue-kiss with someone who barfed a Singapore Sling bolus into your mouth, and then four years later you're with someone else and you feel good and you realize how beautiful it all was and then it's all melancholy/happiness, sort of? That's the kind of singer Dionne Warwick is. She's beautiful. Dionne, paired with Bacharach's string/horn/reed arrangements, comes up as a lyric mezzo-sopranoid par-excellence, melodious/expressiveness-wise. If you've never gotten into her, you ought to. Get hep to Dionne Warwick. For your own sake."
Views: 114868 dibotis